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There are several ways to try ingredients before your brew day. Common techniques are tasting wort, chewing on grain SMASH beers or making a test batch. None of these approaches are ideal since making a batch that doesn't turn out as expected sucks and tasting wort isn't the same as a finished beer. In this tutorial, I will show you how to isolate different ingredients, in small batches, all at once. We will focus on five grains today, but there's no limit to the number of batches you can brew on a given day. But there's more! You can use this technique to test hops, different yeasts strains or to design a beer recipe! 

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-Scoundrel

 


Comments

04/06/2013 8:46pm

This is great! I had never thought about doing this, but it just makes so much sense! Couple this idea with the bud light dry hop idea over here: http://www.bertusbrewery.com/2013/03/dry-hopped-bud-light.html and you can be crafting recipes with much less trial and error in no time!

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04/08/2013 9:30am

Thanks Brett! It's been fun tasting the differences between all of the specialty grains and really does not take much time or effort to do this. As scoundrel mentiones in the article, people can use their stovetop with jars in the kettle if they don't want to use the microwave--just keep your hand on that temperature knob to get past the hot break.

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05/10/2013 9:04pm

Clever thinking; I like it. To take this to the next level one could even do things like adjuncts (rice, wheat, corn) by mixing in some base malt and being a little more careful about holding a good mash temp (water bath style)

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